Older parents feel the pinch after retirement

Charterbridge

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Older parents feel the pinch after retirement

Older parents feel the pinch after retirement
A study from the insurer LV= suggests that one million parents will still be supporting their children after retiring because of the trend for having families later in life. The study, found that between 1992 and 2012, the number of men having children after 45 had risen by 298 per cent
The Times, p. 15
Also appeared in : The Daily Telegraph, p.10-11

Crosby gives up third of pension and knighthood
Sir James Crosby, the former chief executive of HBOS, is dramatically giving up his knighthood and almost a third of his £580,000-a-year pension after he was severely criticised by a Parliamentary Commission on Banking Standards report into the downfall of the bank.
The Daily Telegraph Business, p. 1
Also appeared in : Financial Times, p.1, The Guardian, p.1-4, The Independent, p.11, The Times, p.1-6, International Herald Tribune, p.17

Regulator may fine RBS after customers left without access
Royal Bank of Scotland could face a fine from the City regulator the Financial Conduct Authority for the computer glitch that left millions of customers unable to access their accounts last summer.
The Daily Telegraph Business, p. 8
Also appeared in : Independent i, p.40, The Guardian, p.31, The Independent, p.50, Financial Times Companies and Markets, p.15

Cost of new financial regulation to rise by 15%
The UK’s ‘twin peaks’ regulation, comprising of the Prudential Regulation Authority and the independent Financial Conduct Authority, will cost £646.3m for 2013-14, up 15 per cent from last year’s bill for the single FSA.
This abstract from the Financial Times was produced by Kantar Media
Financial Times, p. 4
Also appeared in : The Daily Telegraph Business, p.3, The Times, p.37

First step to be taken in launch of business bank
In the first phase of the government’s new business bank Business Secretary Vince Cable will today pledge £300m for small and medium-sized enterprises struggling to access finance. .
This abstract from the Financial Times was produced by Kantar Media
Financial Times, p. 4

Icap faces new inquiry in US on rate-rigging claims
Icap was tight-lipped yesterday after fresh allegations emerged linking it to investigations by regulators into the manipulation of interest rates. The inter-dealer broker, led by Michael Spencer, is already in the sights of the Financial Services Authority, which is investigating Libor rate rigging. It was reported yesterday that the US futures regulator has issued subpoenas to Icap and several large banks about the ISDAFIX benchmark, an interest rate swap mechanism run from New York.
The Independent, p. 53
Also appeared in : The Daily Telegraph Business, p.4, Independent i, p.43, The Times, p.38

PM insists country will not be next to need a bailout
Slovenia’s prime minister, Alenka Bratusek, has attempted to quash speculation that she will become the next eurozone leader to seek a bailout, after an influential report warned that the country faces the threat of a “severe banking crisis”. On an official trip to Brussels yesterday, Bratusek insisted that her government was committed to fixing Slovenia’s banks, which are struggling with bad debts as a double-dip recession continues.
The Guardian, p. 27
Also appeared in : Financial Times, p.6, The Times, p.41, International Herald Tribune, p.13

Germany should leave eurozone if it cannot agree to eurobonds, Soros says
George Soros has launched a stinging critique of Germany’s role in the euro crisis and suggested the single currency’s prospects would be improved if its most dominant member were to quit.
The Guardian, p. 27

States bow to pressure on bank secrecy rules
It is reported that Austria and Luxembourg are preparing to ease longstanding and controversial bank secrecy rules, allowing other EU member states access to their depositors’ account details amid mounting pressure to crack down on tax evasion in Europe.
This abstract from the Financial Times was produced by Kantar Media
Financial Times, p. 6

EU launches MasterCard probe
The EU launched an antitrust probe into MasterCard yesterday on fears that it was distorting competition and overcharging retailers.
This abstract from the Financial Times was produced by Kantar Media
Financial Times Companies and Markets, p. 18

Austrian bank chief returns €2m pay
The chief executive of Austria’s second-largest bank paid back €2m of his pay from 2012, saying that executive remuneration could sometimes “turn out to be too high”.
This abstract from the Financial Times was produced by Kantar Media
Financial Times Companies and Markets, p. 19
Also appeared in : The Daily Telegraph Business, p.4

Cash printing can continue without risk, insists IMF
Central banks could unleash billions of pounds more in quantitative easing with little threat of stoking inflation, according to analysis by the International Monetary Fund.
The Daily Telegraph Business, p. 4

U.S. SENATE, DISMISSING CONCERNS, CONFIRMS WHITE AS HEAD OF S.E.C.
The U.S. Senate has confirmed Mary Jo White as head of the Securities and Exchange Commission, dismissing concerns about her close ties to the Wall Street banks she will now oversee.
International Herald Tribune, p. 17

A call to restrict ‘dark pool’ trading
The chief executives of the three largest stock exchanges in the United States are joining forces for the first time to push regulators to rein in the increasing amount of trading that is moving off public exchanges and onto platforms like so-called dark pools.
International Herald Tribune, p. 16

The above articles appeared on 10/04/13 reproduced with the kind permission of Kantar Media UK. All rights reserved.

Charterbridge Private Financial Planning, Independent Financial Advice, Thornbury, Bristol.